The Sweat Glands

The sweat glands are multiple small tubular glands found in the skin of humans and used to externally secrete sweat through the skin pores to eventually regulate body temperature.

The sweat glands are multiple small tubular glands found in the skin of humans and used to externally secrete sweat through the skin pores to eventually regulate body temperature.

Sweat which is a transparent liquid containing salts and water is discharged from the body to control body temperature. Another substance produced by the sweat glands is pheromones which is a chemical substance released by the body to attract others in a communicating way. Sweating also is one way of hydrating your skin and balancing body fluids and electrolytes as well as chemicals in our body such as sodium and calcium.

Eccrine Glands

One kind of sweat gland is known as eccrine sweat glands which exist almost all over our body but their density differs from one place to another. Eccrine sweat glands are used as a means of cooling while apocrine sweat glands exist at the armpits and perianal sections of the human body. The eccrine sweat gland is controlled by the nervous system and starts to secrete water to the skin surface when internal body temperature rises such that heat is removed through evaporation.

Apocrine Glands

The apocrine glands secrete fatty sweat into the gland tubule. The sweat is pushed to the skin surface where bacteria begin to multiply to eventually cause odor especially when a person is under emotional stress thereby allowing the contraction of tubule wall.

An aluminum free antiperspirant enables the natural regulation of body temperature while ensuring the continuous discharge of toxins when sweating. Antiperspirant with aluminum can effectively stop you from sweating due to the sweat blocking property of aluminum but unsafe for your health. However, the use of antiperspirant and deodorants with aluminum allows the accumulation of aluminum in our body which may cause Alzheimer’s disease and breast cancer in women, and also may produce a negative impact on the blood brain barrier. Aluminum is a neurotoxin and can also generate other adverse effects in our bodies.

Antiperspirants are considered the first line of defense or treatment for underarm excessive sweating due to its availability in stores, and can also be used in other parts of the body where hyperhidrosis takes place. Antiperspirants can help reduce apocrine sweat production not only under the arms but also around the breasts and in the groin. Bacteria that normally exist on the skin break down apocrine sweat to produce a very offensive body odor which gets worse when the level of apocrine sweat production is higher.

However, antiperspirants should not be applied on the mouth, nose, eyelids, genitals and anus. Antiperspirants may also cause dermatitis especially on the skin around the underarm area. People with eczema are at risk of developing a reaction to the use of an antiperspirant.